New books for a new month

Books - May 1

Just a tiny shipment of new titles today – the rest of the box contained re-stocks of favourite titles. New books to the shop span rubber bands, invention, peculiar children, library adventures, outnumbered parents and transparency on the internet.

– “Hooked On Rubber Band Jewelry” by Elizabeth Kollmar
Go beyond the loom with Hooked on Rubber Band Jewelry! Young crafting prodigy Elizabeth M. Kollmar takes the rubber band jewelry craze to a whole new level, with innovative techniques and totally cool designs. This amazing book shows you how to create dazzling rubber band bracelets and necklaces without ever using a loom! All you need is a double-ended crochet hook to get started making fabulous bling. Elizabeth takes you step-by-step through every stage of the process, with clear how-to photos and easy-to-follow diagrams. Her simple crochet hook method allows you to weave your creations in any width or length that you want. You ll learn to expand the possibilities of rubber band jewelry by adding attractive charms, beads, and buttons. Twelve awesome projects each include endless variations for hours of creative fun.

– “Us Conductors” by Sean Michaels
In a finely woven series of flashbacks and correspondence, Lev Termen, the Russian scientist, inventor, and spy, tells the story of his life to his “one true love,” Clara Rockmore, the finest theremin player in the world. In the first half of the book, we learn of Termen’s early days as a scientist in Leningrad during the Bolshevik Revolution, the acclaim he receives as the inventor of the theremin, and his arrival in 1930s New York under the aegis of the Russian state. In the United States he makes a name for himself teaching the theremin to eager music students and marketing his inventions to American companies. In the second half, the novel builds to a crescendo as Termen returns to Russia, where he is imprisoned in a Siberian gulag and later brought to Moscow, tasked with eavesdropping on Stalin himself. Throughout all this, his love for Clara remains constant and unflagging, traveling through the ether much like a theremin’s notes. Us Conductors is steeped in beauty, wonder, and looping heartbreak, a sublime debut that inhabits the idea of invention on every level.

– “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children” by Ransom Riggs
A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of very curious photographs.

It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.

A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.

– “Olivia Goes to the Library” by Lauren Forte
Olivia discovers that a good book can be hard to find in this Level 1 Ready-to-Read story!

During a visit to the library, Olivia’s favorite book is accidentally returned instead of renewed. Can she find it among the stacks before someone else checks it out?

This book-tastic tale is a Level 1 Ready-to-Read adaptation of a TV episode.

– “Dad is Fat” by Jim Gaffigan
In Dad is Fat, stand-up comedian Jim Gaffigan, who’s best known for his legendary riffs on Hot Pockets, bacon, manatees, and McDonald’s, expresses all the joys and horrors of life with five young children—everything from cousins (“celebrities for little kids”) to toddlers’ communication skills (“they always sound like they have traveled by horseback for hours to deliver important news”), to the eating habits of four year olds (“there is no difference between a four year old eating a taco and throwing a taco on the floor”). Reminiscent of Bill Cosby’s Fatherhood, Dad is Fat is sharply observed, explosively funny, and a cry for help from a man who has realized he and his wife are outnumbered in their own home.

– “The Circle” by Dave Eggers
The Circle is the exhilarating new novel from Dave Eggers, best-selling author of A Hologram for the King, a finalist for the National Book Award.

When Mae Holland is hired to work for the Circle, the world’s most powerful internet company, she feels she’s been given the opportunity of a lifetime. The Circle, run out of a sprawling California campus, links users’ personal emails, social media, banking, and purchasing with their universal operating system, resulting in one online identity and a new age of civility and transparency. As Mae tours the open-plan office spaces, the towering glass dining facilities, the cozy dorms for those who spend nights at work, she is thrilled with the company’s modernity and activity. There are parties that last through the night, there are famous musicians playing on the lawn, there are athletic activities and clubs and brunches, and even an aquarium of rare fish retrieved from the Marianas Trench by the CEO. Mae can’t believe her luck, her great fortune to work for the most influential company in America—even as life beyond the campus grows distant, even as a strange encounter with a colleague leaves her shaken, even as her role at the Circle becomes increasingly public. What begins as the captivating story of one woman’s ambition and idealism soon becomes a heart-racing novel of suspense, raising questions about memory, history, privacy, democracy, and the limits of human knowledge.

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