Let’s talk about the weather…

No, let’s talk about new records that just came in this week…

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Ty Segall – Sleeper
Between two minds, between two places, beyond Twins, Sleeper envisions a world of haves and have-nots, but the currency that separates them is psychic. Class is determined by where your head goes – and Ty puffs the pied pipe, leading you back to what you forgot you knew. Sleeper is Ty-fi, for sure, but it’s not that different from this world we live in. It’s a hard-knock existenz, but there’s plenty tenderness to try, and the trip is crafted especially to fit in your ears and sail down the canals deep into your skull. The acoustics expand upon contact, creating new shapes for you to fill inside yourself over the full-length of a true album-length entertainment. With Sleeper, Ty Segall explores your mind, coming through his own head to slip inside with thought sharing. Ty engineered this one from beginning to end, and his ultimate sonics were accessed with a freaky hand and an instinct for what makes something perfect. Sleeper flows more colors than ever before through your mind’s eye, pushing the walls of the universe out just a micron further, making everything heavier and lighter all at once, to allow for one moment that will live forever.
Check out the Pitchform review here: http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/18398-ty-segall-sleeper/

Superchunk – I Hate Music
Superchunk has offered up that sonic salve off and on for two decades, at various volumes. Like most great bands that started loud, they also explored the quiet, beginning the 1990s with a self-titled debut and ending them with Come Pick Me Up, a stately set that incorporated strings and horns. 2001 saw the even gentler Here’s to Shutting Up, but the rest of the aughts saw so little activity that the end seemed nigh. I Hate Music is Majesty’s dark twin. It’s similarly aggressive- often moreso – and every bit as energetic. It reflects the joys of a life spent immersed in music (‘Me & You & Jackie Mittoo,’ ‘Trees of Barcelona’), but there’s a dark undercurrent as well. That title isn’t tongue-in-cheek, but it’s really more a question than a statement: When you’re 20, lazy co-workers and romantic missteps number among your biggest worries; two decades later, life’s bigger questions knock louder and louder, demanding answers.

Telekinesis! – Telekinesis!
Telekinesis is Michael Benjamin Lerner. Michael recorded Telekinesis! at Two Sticks Audio in Seattle with producer Chris Walla (Death Cab for Cutie, The Decemberists, Tegan and Sara). Michael wrote and sang all of the songs and played nearly all of the instruments on the album, but tours with a full band that includes David Broecker (guitar), Jonie Broecker (bass, keyboards), and Chris Staples (guitar). Influenced both by the carefully constructed timeless pop of the 60s and 70s and by the nonchalance and brevity of classic indie rock, Walla and Lerner approached the recording of Telekinesis! with the goal that each song’s tracking and mixing would be done to analog tape in a single day and that they would never look back. Vinyl + download include 5 bonus tracks from the 2009 self-released Coast of Carolina EP. Limited to 1,000 copies.

Disappears – Era – Available August 27
“Era” is the 4th annual report from Chicago powerhouse quartet Disappears. Insular & dark, the album sees the band further refining their love of dub, minimalism & repetition into their most original & stark (re: SUICIDE-esque, folks!) set yet, harkening back to the early 80s post punk period, when almost anything seemed possible with the classic 2 guitar line, bass & drums line up, & exploration & expansion of what could done with these elements was at the fore. Disappears at their most abrasive, contemplative, & paranoid – it’s the sound of the void looking back.

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